Batmen Analysis

So, I’ve been wanting to do this for quite some time. You see, there’s a whole lot of Batman movies out there along with a good number of Batmen. With different actors, playing the same character, in different movie adaptations, there come arguments between fans over the superiority of certain adaptations and portrayals.

In this post, I am going to analyze all the live-action movie Batmen, from Michael Keaton to Ben Affleck, and judge them based on how well they portrayed both Bruce Wayne, and Batman. Before we continue, let’s briefly discuss the two personalities. Bruce Wayne is a billionaire orphan, disciplined and mature for his age. While he may be well known to the world, he can be called reclusive. His dark past is what gives him his wisdom and what gives him the look of a man who has dealt with the truth, up close. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have feelings or a sense of humor. He can be touched, and he ain’t witless.
Batman, Bruce’s vigilante personality, is an all righteous, assertive tough-guy who values human-life above all emotion and justice. His instincts and choices are rarely to be doubted. He is also a quick-witted strategist and a really skilled fighter. Also, he is worthy enough to lift the Mjolnir. He knows the difference between what’s right and what’s (seemingly) needed, and he knows better than to let his emotions drive him. Well, let’s start analysing, shall we? … 

 

Physics jokes

I’ve been casually going through the answers to this question for the past hour. I came across a lot of hilarious ones and an almost equal number of those that are probably hilarious to those that get them. Yes, that does imply that there are quite a lot of them that I don’t get. There used to be more, but I figured them out, all thanks to the internet.

It’s amazing how educational this shit can be. Consider the following scenario:

Joe is a Physics student. Joe loves Physics. Joe wants to be a Physicist. Joe idolizes Hawking, and shares – on his social media – jokes about Schrodinger’s cat. Joe is browsing Quora and he comes across this question. Among the answers, he reads this: Erwin Schrodinger and Werner Heisenberg are driving down the road with the top down, having the time of their lives. They blow past a hidden state patrol officer who jumps in his car and pulls them over a few miles down the road. The officer gets out of his car, hitches up his britches, and saunters up to Heisenberg who is driving.
He motions to roll the window down and Werner complies, then the officer asks: “Sir, do you have any idea how fast you were going?” To which Heisenberg replies: “No Sir. But I know exactly where I am.”

Joe doesn’t get it. He opens Google in a new tab and types “Heisenberg’s.” Googles suggest’s his uncertainty principle and the slightest bit of reading gets Joe smiling. Now he reads through the rest of the joke, which he gets, and reposts it.

Why does Joe behave this way, and how is this shit educational?

It’s understandable for people to not get jokes, and even more understandable for people to not get Physics related jokes. But is it acceptable for a Physics geek to not get a particular joke? Of course it is. Joe, however, was afraid that if people found out that he didn’t know Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle they’ll never respect his intelligence again. He is particularly afraid of his fellow “physicists” finding out. Joe felt ashamed of himself. He couldn’t stand how he’d failed to get a popular Physics joke – one that starred Hawking. He felt compelled to figure that joke out and chose to research and expand his knowledge enough to, if not more, get that joke. When he was done, there was one less Physics joke that he didn’t get, and one more principle that he knew.

It seems that Joe’s preferred road to being a Physicist involves reducing the number of Physics jokes that he doesn’t get to a minimum. It sounds funny, and stupid, but it’s smart, and it works. Let’s do a little math, shall we? There are 100+ answers on that Question. Most of the ones I came across had at least two jokes. It’s unlikely for two successive jokes in an answer to be about the same principle, so that means that there are at least 200 jokes below that answer. Obviously, there would be repetition, so let’s just go noob and halve the number. Now we got 100 unique jokes. If Joe reads them all fails to get half of them, he will research and read up on at least 50 different principles/theories.

Jokes motivate Joe to study. But what if Joe actually spent all that time, which he spends reading jokes, studying? That way he could still learn 50(or more) different principles/theories in the same time as he could before and he could do more.

Conclusion: Joe is lazy, not stupid.

 

“Omelette du fromage”

So, around the time Assasin’s Creed Unity came out, I came across this video. It was quite popular among my friends back then. At 1:18, we see two guys seated on a table facing one another and as something lands on it, one of them says: “Oh no! My omelette du fromage” at which, Arno pops up and replies: “It’s actually omelette au fromage.” That’s the first and last time I heard that phrase.

A few days ago, I came across the term again somewhere on the internet and so I googled it. Its literal meaning being “omelette of cheese,” it actually originates from an episode of the popular tv show “Dexter’s Laboratory.” The episode itself is called “The Big Cheese,” in which, Dexter can’t say anything except “oomelette du fromage”. 

Funnily enough, throughout the episode, his day at school is better than the average because, as it happens, saying that same damned phrase everytime he opens his mouth, seems to work out just fine for him. He nails a french test, and a mathematics question and gets a bunch of girls fawning, and even manages to deal with some bullies.

So why does Arno say “It’s actually omelette au fromage.”? Because “omelette au fromage” means “omelette with cheese,” and that’s the correct term to use for a cheese omelete. As you can guess, fromage  means cheese, while omelette means pretty much what you think it does. Therefore, “du”=”of” and “au”=”with.”

 

The Dilemma of Programming Languages

So, I’ve been up and laptop-ing for the last two hours or so, and all I’ve been doing is reading one article after another centered on programming languages. A good fraction of those articles lashed on how Javascript sucks. It’s been a lot of continuous reading, all thanks to catchy links located throughout the articles, and at any given time there have been at least 7 tabs (with articles) open at all times. Even as of now, there are exactly seven other tabs, besides Facebook, open in my browser.

It all started when I, scrolling through my news feed, out of sheer boredom, landed on a post by Richard Eng, an evangelist for SmallTalk whom I first came across on Quora, and while reading, I clicked on some other links and opened them in new tabs, and then the process repeated itself. The more I read, the clearer became Eng’s views on the different languages. It was clear that he hates JavaScript, and just the first part of this post by him shows that he definitely has a point.

While going through his list of his JavaScript alternatives, which are all basically Transpilers, I also discovered Brython, which is basically Python running in JavaScript’s place as the client-side scripting language. It’s pretty cool actually, although apparently the code is transpiled from Python to JS during runtime and that’s gotta take a toll on the performance.

Also, like countless other people, Mr. Smalltalk was kind enough to tell us that PHP is one of the three languages he can’t stand. While I agree that JS deserves to be on that list, my love for and comfort with PHP is too strong. It hurts when people constantly tell me that PHP sucks, and that it shouldn’t be used on any serious projects. Maybe they are right, maybe they aren’t, but I do believe that PHP is going to be around for a long time.

While reading about the desire for improvements to JavaScript, I wondered about what would be the best way to work towards them. They can’t just change everything like Angular did with the 2.0, that could break the web. But if they offer backwards compatibility, it would just keep growing and ultimately become a huge confusing mess.
I guess that it’s fairly safe to say, that with programming languages, it’s important to make the correct decisions during the initial stages of development.

You might be wondering what the point of this article is, or what exactly is the actual “dilemma.” To be honest, there isn’t a point. I’m just thinking out loud. Incoming opinions lead to indecisiveness, which in turn results in time going wasted.

 

The Virtual Reality I want.

There’s something of a silent war going on around us at this time, and it has been going on for quite a while. I know that I wrote “Virtual Reality” in the title, but that’s merely due to the fact that it’s the generally preferred term for all of those projects out there making headsets and goggles, but otherwise this post does cover my ideas about its brothers that go by the names “Mixed Reality” and “Augmented Reality.”

So, before we go on, let’s talk about how the brothers differ. Virtual Reality is where Oculus is the major player in the market, and has met fine success. The HTC Vive is another which may not have stirred as much excitement but so far, all things positive have been said about it. The idea of virtual reality, in terms your grandma could understand, is that you put on a headset and you find yourself in a different world altogether. You look around, and all you get to see is what the headset shows you, while you are completely distracted from what’s actually around you. Rather like the Nygmatech in Batman: Forever. You put it on, and the next thing you know, you are in a forest; or perhaps in the middle of the French Revolution? … 

 

Interstellar vs 2001: A Space Odyssey

Ever since it’s release in 2014, Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar”, has often been compared to Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

I was fairly late at watching both. Since I missed the release of 2001 by more than 30 years because I wasn’t at all close to existing around the time it was released and for the the first few years after I had started to exist, it wasn’t entirely possible for me to watch and comprehend it.
As for Interstellar, all I have to say is that I wasn’t really watching many movies when it came out. I guess it was because my internet sucked and because I was dealing with exams so I put it off for a while, since I didn’t want to ruin it by watching it in a hurry. It wouldn’t have made much difference, but since I had heard good things about it, I wanted to be relaxed and with ample time before I set about to watch it.

My reaction to both was: What the hell?

2001: A Space Odyssey,  is considered the ultimate classic and some would go as far as calling it the best one of Kubrick’s works. (Having never watched any of his others, I can’t say much on the matter.)  So it started off with a music that sounded pretty familiar and that’s all thanks to Toy Story, and after a few minutes into it I was like what the hell? That scene didn’t have to be as stretched. And my reaction was pretty similar to the one in which a woman walks along a velcro’ed path carrying a lunch tray to a sleeping guy. The scene with the apes too was unnecessarily long so I fast forwarded through it and missed the actual punchline (i.e. how they suddenly discover that a bone can be used as a melee weapon). Oh and the part at the end that is known as the “Stargate sequence” All you see for 10 minutes is landscapes with colors messed up and for what?
Other than that, the lack of a decent conclusion might make it a cool suspense for some, but for me, it makes it suck. Nothing was explained. Although the novels that were released, and the sequel that followed, and countless fan theories suggested that it was aliens leaving all those monoliths and stuff. Let’s face it though, who watched the sequel or read the novels? Not a lot of people. 

… 

 

Minimalism and security.

Minimalism helps. It always does. It’s clean, cool, beautiful and relaxing. Oh and it allows for security in software. Every single element in an application, every single feature, every program in an operating system could open doors for attackers to get in through.

The recently discovered Mac malware Eleanor, which opens a backdoor, works by exploiting a vulnerability in the MacUpdate application.

iPhone jail-breaking applications, not that I have anything against them, make use of similar vulnerabilities. The original JailbreakMe exploited a vulnerability in Safari in iOS 1.1.1, while the second version used a vulnerability in the PDF reader.

I do realize that it looks like I am suggesting that Safari or PDF readers or updating apps should not exist, but what I am actually suggesting is that the more an app grows, the greater the chances for an attacker to get in. We can always, at the very least, keep stuff simple. For example, smartphones could have less pre-installed bloatware? Samsung could stop shipping their devices with apps like “Papergarden” or “Flipboard” or “Samsung Apps”  installed by default?

 

Does your personality change when you switch languages?

Lifehack thinks so, and I can’t help but agree. It’s something I have always noticed. Sometimes you switch languages while talking simply because you feel that some things are better said in a particular language.Different languages allow us to express ourselves differently.

From what I believe, it’s not a matter of having as many personalities as the languages you know, but a matter of how much at home you are with them. Some languages don’t allow you to be yourself as much as others and vice versa.