On “The Sleeper Awakes” – H.G. Wells

I don’t exactly remember how I discovered this book. But at least a couple of months ago, I came across the name, looked up the synopsis and downloaded it with the intention of reading it on the first chance. Less than a month ago, on a particular midnight, I was unable to sleep and having little to no desire to take up something educational, I decided to go through my collection of fiction. The H.G. Wells folder caught my eye and I opened it to reveal this book along with a couple of others. Remembering suddenly what it was about, I decided to start reading it.

Fun Fact: The first chapter was called “INSOMNIA.” Also adding that although I mean to not talk in detail about any events in the book, depending on your perspective, there may or may not be spoilers ahead so proceed with caution. … 

 

Explaining Savitar to a noob be like

Me: Hey, Tom Felton made an appearance in the Flash.

They: Who’s that again?

Me: Malfoy.

They: What does he play?

Me: Julian Albert. A CSI working with Barry. But sometimes he gets mind-controlled and takes on the mantle of “Alchemy.”

They: Who controls him?

Me: Savitar.

They: Who’s Savitar?

Me: Barry.

They: Who’s Barry again?

Me: Flash.

… 

 

Toggl’s “Building a Horse with Programming” comic explained

If you don’t know what this is about, you should first go and check it out.

So, C++ is, for me at least, an intolerable programming language. Everything from the code to the resultant program tends to be as ugly as it gets. More than half the time it feels like it was hacked-together to include everything. However, it has been around for a very long time and you can use it to do just about anything that you could want to do with a programming language. Only, the experience and the result may not exactly be great.

Then we have Java. The main problem with Java is that for a language that aims to be useful for all sorts of applications on all platforms, it’s missing a lot of features that are commonly used by full-stack developers. Very often, when writing programs in Java, programmers end up spending more time than they need to creating new types and methods so that they can use them in the program that they actually set out to write.

Ever since npm and nodejs gained popularity, JavaScript has become one of the world’s most widely used languages and npm is probably the most used package manager of them all. And the thing about Javascript programmers is that they use a lot of external libraries and packages and every once in a while, they add their own package to the global repository just to get a kick out of it. By now there are probably more packages in npm than there are libraries for any other language out there and when you are a JavaScript developer, you really have use them if you want to get any work done. The pinked “Backbone” and “Angular” are references to Backbone.js and Angular.js, two popular JS frameworks.

NoSQL refers to database systems that don’t use SQL and are non-relational. An example is MongoDB, which stores JSON objects grouped into collections. The joke is that the non-relational model doesn’t always expose enough information for you to be able to access your objects without using the abstract api.

COBOL? Well, I guess no one entirely gets it except for its creator.

Lisp has a lot of parentheses. Just google sample codes for lisp and you’d know.

C# is a fairly complete and tolerable language. The problem? Microsoft. Windows. The thing about the costume is that C# is basically Java in a costume (it closely resembles Java in terms of syntax and semantics.) The camel is basically the windows environment. Basically, it means that C# programs don’t always work as intended if not running on Windows.

Assembly doesn’t really offer a lot of language features. There’s a basic set of operations that have to be used for everything. But coding something in such a low level language means you get control over aspects that most languages abstract over. So you can make a really efficient program, hence, the thing about running.

Everyone hates PHP. They say it’s a terrible and unsafe language and has unpredictable behavior. I personally have reasons to really like PHP but I will still go ahead and tell you that most good posts on the subject target aspects of the language that really do suck so yeah some of the hate is justified.

 

SQL Server screwups and how to fix them.

So recently I installed Visual Studio 2017 on a laptop and I installed it with only the ASP.NET and WinForms features. I was working on a webapp and initializing the database when I realized that VS was completely unable to connect to the database. I opened the “SQL Server Object Explorer” and tried to manually connect to the MSSQLLocalDB instance and I got this error.

A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections. (provider: SQL Network Interfaces, error: 50 – Local Database Runtime error occurred. Error occurred during LocalDB instance startup: SQL Server process failed to start.) (Microsoft SQL Server)

I tried to start the service from the CMD and I kept on getting similar errors. Eventually, I concluded that the installation was corrupted and therefore tried reinstalling LocalDB. Guess what? It got me past this error but introduced me to another. It was something like this.

CREATE FILE encountered operating system error 5(Access is denied.) while attempting to open or create the physical file ‘c:\Users\AnasDatabaseName-asdf5sdfasd5fs5dfs5f.mdf’.

This time, the CREATE Database command was failing because it was trying to create and MDF file in my “Users” folder. I checked the default location for the databases and it was in a sub-sub-sub-sub-folder inside AppData. A bit of Googling told me that this was actually a bug in the program itself and had been fixed in a recent update. So I just downloaded the latest Cumulative Update from the Microsoft site and it did the trick.